Rock Climbing - So You Want to Be a Rock Climber

So you want to be a rock climber. You'd like to climb a rock wall or maybe hang off the side of a rock formation somewhere. Well, you'll have several styles to choose from to do it. It could be pretty easy and safe or you could seriously risk your life. Either way, you'll need to know exactly what you're doing. There should be no room for guess work.Do you want to learn more? Visit  Joshua Tree

Rock climbing is climbing to the summit of a natural rock formation or climbing to the summit of a manmade rock wall. It could also be climbing to a designated endpoint on a climbing route. It doesn't always mean that you've got to reach the very top. A sectional climb like this is referred to as a pitch. If you're climbing several routes consecutively, it would be considered a multi-pitch climb.

Rock climbing has been around for nearly a hundred years. Climbers have encountered many kinds of rock formations all around the world. It's not surprising then that rock climbing has branched into several more distinct styles. Most of the rock climbing done today is considered to be a form of free climbing. This involves using solely one's own physical ability to climb. Equipment is used but only as a means of protection from falling.

Aid climbing. The safest method of rock climbing is aid climbing. Equipment is used for all handholds and all footholds, meaning that the climber is assisted every step of the way. When rock climbing first began, this method allowed for ascents that were believed impossible. It was this fantastic enabling quality of aid climbing that helped to bring such interest to the sport.

Bouldering. This style of rock climbing involves short climbing routes that are near enough to the ground that a fall should not result in the climber's death. There is no rope or harness but, preferably, there is a helmet. The only other option for protection is to use a bouldering pad (protective mat). The climbing partner (an absolute necessity) on the ground usually directs the location of this pad, aligning it with the climber's location. The climbing partner is also the all-seeing eye that warns the climber of hazardous areas.

Top Roping. This is probably the easiest and safest way to free climb. A rope is already secured through an anchor at the top of the climb. A belayer, your climbing partner, holds onto the opposite end of the rope, controlling any give or take while keeping it taut.

Lead Climbing. This involves a lead climber who ascends with one end of a rope tied to his harness. The belayer, the leader's partner, holds onto the other end of the rope, giving or taking up slack as needed. The lead climber sets up a belay system as she climbs, securing safety anchors for her partner to use, which is also the fail-safe system to catch the lead climber in case she falls.

 
 

ROCK CLIMBING COURSES

Uprising Adventure Guides offers a complete outdoor instruction curriculum. Our Southern California courses are offered exclusively.

We offer year round courses for individuals, groups, families & corporate events. Private guiding is also offered at anytime, please call us for details.

Enjoy, and don’t hesitate to call if you have any questions.

PRIVATE GUIDING

We will customize your Uprising Adventure to your level, from brand new beginner, to the very advanced climber.

Book a half, full, or multiple days of climbing. You will enjoy your choice.

We promise to make your Uprising Adventure Guides experience one you will remember for a lifetime.